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Rolling higher "wins" - why?

posted Jan 14, 2013 18:16:59 by BrianP
I may be asking a rather "silly" question here, but in RQ6, when rolling opposition to an NPC or another character, and both succeed, why would a higher roll win out over a lower, especially when a super-low roll means a critical (10% of skill), and a 00 is a fumble?

My guess is it would mean that the character with the higher, yet still successful roll, managed to eke out a success just barely. But if so, that still doesn't make sense to me, as the lower roll, being "more" successful, would in my mind be a more skillful representation of success.
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8 replies
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PeteNash said Jan 14, 2013 18:21:01
Because statistically it is the same as how much under your skill you rolled, but far, far quicker to see at a glance when comparing rolls.

The way you should look at it is...
1) Whoever rolls the better success level wins.
2) If the success level is tied, whoever rolled higher wins.

Hope that helps.
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bluefenix42 said Jan 14, 2013 18:47:11
Mathematically, it gives an advantage to characters with higher skill values.

Imagine Alice and Bob both have Brawn 50% and arm wrestle. Alice rolls a 25, so Bob must roll from 26 to 50 to win.

Now, imagine Alice has Brawn 50%, but Bob has 75%. Alice rolls that same 25, but now Bob can roll anywhere from 26 to *75* to win. That gives Bob a much higher chance of coming out ahead on the opposed roll, as befitting his higher skill value.
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BrianP said Jan 14, 2013 18:51:51
Thanks Pete, that makes a bit more sense to me.
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BrianP said Jan 14, 2013 18:53:03
bluefenix42, that makes a ton of sense. Not sure why my mind couldn't wrap around it, but now I see it!
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jackpersona42 said Jan 14, 2013 20:22:31
I've often wondered if there was an easy to explain and calculate way to have the critical range at the top of the numbers as well. So that with a skill of 60, you're looking for a 55-60 to crit, to keep it consistent. But I've not considered whether or not that would skew the "highest roll wins" mechanic.
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bluefenix42 said Jan 14, 2013 20:38:30
I've often wondered if there was an easy to explain and calculate way to have the critical range at the top of the numbers as well. So that with a skill of 60, you're looking for a 55-60 to crit, to keep it consistent. But I've not considered whether or not that would skew the "highest roll wins" mechanic.


It actually would skew things a little. Allow me to expand on my earlier example.

See, I left out one detail from the scenario where Alice and Bob (both with Brawn 50%) arm-wrestle, and Alice rolls a 25. Bob can win with a normal success on a roll of 26 to 50, OR win with a crit on a roll of 1 to 5. So, he's actually got a 30% chance to win at this point.

However, if you changed it so Bob's crit range is 46 to 50 (instead of 1 to 5), he now only wins on rolls from 26 to 50, giving him a 25% chance of success. The modification has robbed Bob of 5% of his chance to win because the new crit range covers numbers *that would have won anyway*.
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jackpersona42 said Jan 14, 2013 23:47:37
Good point, fenix. I had an inkling in the back of my mind that it wouldn't be a one-to-one change and would need some extra work. I'll stick with the "hard to grok at first blush, but great" system RQ comes with.
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bluefenix42 said Jan 15, 2013 00:11:12
"hard to grok at first blush, but great"


Yeah, the system as-is definitely took me a bit of effort to understand. However, I think once you see the mathematical reasons behind it and the implications thereof, it starts to make a lot more sense why it's set up that way. The system of "roll above X but below Y" also integrates nicely with the way difficulty grades work, since they change what you need to roll under rather than modifying the roll itself.
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