Members | Sign In
All Forums > Rules and Mechanics
avatar

Pet spell question

posted Feb 15, 2013 19:47:57 by thorngumbald
I have a question on the Pet spell. The spell allows a small animal to be used for, among other things, scouting. How does the pet let the caster know the outcome of the scouting expedition? Does the caster see through the pet's eyes? Or can the caster understand the pet's "report" in some way?
page   1
9 replies
avatar
DanTrue said Feb 15, 2013 20:18:53
It states that you take "mental control". I assume this means you see the world through it's eyes, as if you were the pet.

- Dan
avatar
thorngumbald said Feb 15, 2013 20:36:08
That works for me, Dan. That's quite a powerful effect. Thanks,
avatar
thorngumbald said Feb 15, 2013 20:37:37
That works for me, Dan. That's quite a powerful effect. Thanks,
avatar
AmazingOnionMan said Feb 16, 2013 13:34:40
Personally, I go the other way.
If you cast the spell on a rat, a dog or an incect even, it will allow limited control, empathy and ability to communicate.
Sending a sparrow to scout in advance, you'll have to wait for the sparrow to return and tell you what it saw.
In many instances, it will only tell you whether it was noisy, whether it was dangerous(mind that a sparrow might have a different take on "dangerous" than a PC), whether there was water, hot, food etc. It will tell you if there were other animals or people(or monsters).
It might not be able to quantify things, depending on the animal charmed. A raven or a dog might tell you whether it was one, three, many or a lot. A moth will not be able to so.

Even if this is not as powerful as Dan's take on it above, it is still a very useful spell. Remember, it will not only allow you to control animals, it will allow you to calm frightened beasts. It will allow limited communication. It will allow you to command beasts to guard, threaten and even attack.
I tweak the spell slightly further; for domesticated beasts, there is no SIZ-limit, allowing for horse(or elephant)whisperers.
avatar
DanTrue said Feb 16, 2013 14:00:11
AmazingOnionMan speaks some truth. The exact wording of the spell is actually irrellevant, what matters is the setting.

Animal messengers and spies are a stable of sagas - if the caster is a medieval witch, it might make sense that she is actually inside the raven, or that she can speak understand it fully afterwards.

If the caster is Radagast, the spell might rely as much on his ability to understand the animals and their experience as much as the spell itself.

- Dan
avatar
thorngumbald said Feb 16, 2013 14:17:08
It was the communication thing that threw me. If the caster cannot see through the Pet's eyes, then the spell must confer some degree of ability to communicate with the Pet so it can report. If that's the case, can the Pet also talk about what it saw before the spell was cast? Can the caster also understand nearby animals of the same species (ie: gains an actual communicate-with-animals ability)? Although seeing through the eyes is powerful, it seems easier to explain and understand.
avatar
AmazingOnionMan said Feb 16, 2013 15:20:38
If the caster cannot see through the Pet's eyes, then the spell must confer some degree of ability to communicate with the Pet so it can report. If that's the case, can the Pet also talk about what it saw before the spell was cast?
- I say it can, yes.

Can the caster also understand nearby animals of the same species (ie: gains an actual communicate-with-animals ability)?
- I say no. The spell grants a special connection with one unique target. Not the whole herd.

Although seeing through the eyes is powerful, it seems easier to explain and understand.
- And if that is what works for you, that's just fine.

Bear in mind that I am by no means any kind of RQ-authority. I just happened to drop by while you asked a question:-)
avatar
thorngumbald said Feb 16, 2013 16:36:11
Thanks to Dan and the Amazing Onion Man for taking the time to share their thoughts; I really appreciate that. Your comments illuminated the question for me a great deal, and also helped me feel confident that I hadn't misunderstood something. I think I'll try the "observe through the creatures' senses" approach, and if that seems to cause problems I'll adopt the other perspective.
avatar
lawrence.whitaker said Feb 16, 2013 17:26:18
A classic example of the spy-pet is the homunculus Tom Baker's sorcerer uses in 'The Golden Voyage of Sinbad'. I can't recall if that little winged lizard thing reported back, or if Tom Baker saw through its eyes - but still a terrific example, all the same.

Still one of my all-time favourite fantasy films.
Login below to reply: