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Attacking a prone target

posted Mar 23, 2013 23:38:41 by Sunwolfe
Opponent A is prone; he has no action points left; he has no weapon. Opponent B has one action and he attacks Opponent A. What mechanical advantage does Opponent B have? Please cite page numbers.

Cheers.
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10 replies
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lawrence.whitaker said Mar 24, 2013 02:25:58
Opponent A is dead-meat - unless he spends a Luck Point to gain a last-gasp Action (page 124).

Much depends on Opponent B though. He effectively has Opponent A at his mercy. He could Compel Surrender, or be utterly merciless, depending on his nature and the circumstances.
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Sunwolfe said Mar 24, 2013 03:45:55
Thank you, sir!
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DanTrue said Mar 24, 2013 11:11:22
Even if A had AP left, then A would be at a significant disadvantage - as the situational modifier for being prone is formidable if I recall correctly.

But what first threw me off is that B has no "to-hit bonus" against a prone target. But after thinking about it, it makes perfect sense. It is no easier hitting a passive not-defending man who is prone, than one who is up - the mechanical advantage comes in when A tries to defend, which is very hard.

- Dan
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Chris said Mar 24, 2013 11:25:08
Yup, another reason why RQ6 is a great game - well thought out rules
"This is where we hold them! This is where we fight! This is where they die!"
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Skoll said Mar 25, 2013 07:15:19
So coming back to the original question
Sunwolfe wrote
What mechanical advantage does Opponent B have?
the answer would be: none.

DanTrue wrote
But what first threw me off is that B has no "to-hit bonus" against a prone target. But after thinking about it, it makes perfect sense. It is no easier hitting a passive not-defending man who is prone, than one who is up - the mechanical advantage comes in when A tries to defend, which is very hard.
That again, a standing opponent, even without action points, is still moving around. It's not like he's just standing there, waiting to be hit. He just doesn't have the energy/reflexes to actively parry another hit. A prone opponent on the other hand has much less moving capabilities.
[Last edited Mar 25, 2013 07:16:12]
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DanTrue said Mar 25, 2013 07:58:11
That again, a standing opponent, even without action points, is still moving around. It's not like he's just standing there, waiting to be hit. He just doesn't have the energy/reflexes to actively parry another hit. A prone opponent on the other hand has much less moving capabilities.


Except that during the time frame an ordinary strike takes, you rarely move more than perhaps 10 centimeters. You can of course actively move out of the way, or bend backwards etc. but that much movement is reflected in the spending of AP and the combat style roll.

A real-life situation which might reflect one an opponent being out of AP is the Zwerchhau from german Longsword, about 20 seconds into this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ln94E9AGYTc
This situation could of course also arise from failing a parry.

So, when he's out of AP he is actually still performing some other action.
It's not like:
both act, takes 5/3 sec,
both act, takes 5/3 sec,
and then the 3-AP guy act.

Rather, the 2-AP guy uses 5/2 seconds for each swing, the 3-AP guy uses 5/3 second per swing.. because he is faster and more intuitive. So when his 3rd AP comes around, the 2-AP guy is still in the end of his 2nd action, so he's hit while moving his blade back into position or something similar. And of course he will still be moving to some degree, but so will you (likely faster since you have AP left) mitigating his advantage. And a prone guy might also roll a bit around, threaten with a kick to keep you at a distance etc.

- Dan
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Skoll said Mar 26, 2013 07:21:03
Thanks for the explanation. I never imagined longswords could be so fast.
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DanTrue said Mar 31, 2013 00:28:01
They're great fun :-)
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Afon y Bydysawd said Mar 31, 2013 02:42:20
Thanks for the video link. You can totally watch that in terms of RQ6 mechanics.
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DanTrue said Mar 31, 2013 11:32:13
Well, Pete did design the system around his historical martial arts experiences :-) plenty of videos like that flowing around youtube- if nothing else' search for HEMA - historical european martial arts.

Great fun.
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